Author: Tommy Davis

Top Picks: 3D Childhood Murals

These murals created by 3D artists Dan Carpenter, Kiki Connor and Anita Pittler are all comprised of abstract shapes that clash at the edges of the artworks to depict scenes of magical and romantic moments of childhood. One’s reactions to these meticulously created, “childhood fun” playfully flies away from the more serious themes being portrayed in the pieces.

This one is a bit bold and has been deemed NSFW for its extremely explicit content. An illustration by artist Matt Rubin that essentially depicts the hypothetical “Freedom to Pee” signs appearing in buildings around the United States in real life. In the first paintings Rubin depicts fingers flashing from a urine-soaked canvas and in the second installment you can see that Fallon Stone “fucks on the toilet”. It is refreshing to have a real depiction of the same in a mural inspiring artistic instinct of the public to direct artists to produce such designs in real life.

Aesthetically this mural goes beyond just being cleverly coloured, it is voiced to represent the turns down of the American society and the hopes of freedom of the individual; while also encouraging creativity and finding meaning that goes beyond the mainstream view. Trippy colours and flat text reads “fuck it I’m just going to spray on piss and hope shit doesn’t fly” in a subliminal tone as if trying to dissuade “bad” things from happening. Brutal graffiti by former HWY Mural Artists Jabari & Sidney: The poo image is between an actual cartoon of a gnarly excrement and a clear glass of piss (cycling, did someone say unicorn? wow, it’s like unicorn but that’s just silly). According to the founder of HWY Mural Projects Jabari & Sidney, this caused an uproar within the community as the scene carried references to human waste, something the authorities deem obscene. With his signature, Jabari & Sidney choreographed a real life “Banzai” throwdown shooting nazi salutes into a giant cyclone of colorful piss dropping void.

Start to finish, Jabari & Sidney laid 200 hours in order to craft this masterpiece. Had they mistakenly painted American flags all over the wall but just assumed that would be too much effort? Not at all; piss is freakin’ awesome!

“Fuck it; give me the right and the power to pee wherever I want”

According to Pau Gonçalves there’s a well-known urban legend that aged people are often not suited for venturing down the streets of the developed world in large numbers because of their strained mental faculties due to the strong campaigns of authoritarians. In January 2010, someone parodied this legend by having stencils placed everywhere that read “Prawga” in the style of a wall-hanger. The spoof caused controversy in the infamous graffiti community as it wasn’t entirely accurate, to say the least. Still, it is intriguing to see the letter appear to be attempting to confuse and correct the people of Kolkata who are so caught up in their own obsession with urban graffiti culture that they believe any empty space looks like the artist’s name.

All these uses of old grafitti pop up in street art in different ways with different influences but in all cases the image itself is intelligent and well crafted because it has the quality to be seen everywhere, even in the most seedy parts of the city and some of the poorest people. For this piece, a personal favourite of this artist, the artist informs us that the gift has been fully nurtured by Harold L Light, a famous Chinese food Shanghai restaurant that quote Buraimetta on twitter. In other words, this was an homage to all Buraimetta’s muralists without actually ever having opened their doors in Japan.

The Romans and the ‘Magic’ Lens

The Romans took to using a ‘magic lens’ to capture the details under great magnification. Made with a round lens and clear glass mount, the lens was used to punch large holes through the human eye without even having to remove it and then inject wax, which was stored in the lens ring of the lens barrel, to concentrate the light on the lens itself and create the minute focus that allows to go out to 1:1 reproduction ratio.

Close up images from a magical lens became the best ever known. Macro photography is the art of capturing the detail of very small subjects that may not be seen by the naked eye.

Technically, to fall under the category of “macro,” the subject should be captured with a reproduction ratio of 1:1 (i.e., the subject will be captured on the sensor at 100% life-size).

The Romans took to using a ‘magic lens’ to capture the details under great magnification. Made with a round lens and clear glass mount, the lens was used to punch large holes through the human eye without even having to remove it and then inject wax, which was stored in the lens ring of the lens barrel, to concentrate the light on the lens itself and create the minute focus that allows to go out to 1:1 reproduction ratio. Close up images from a magical lens became the best ever known.

Interesting concept. Isera, your photographs looked like they were shot with a magnification device, like in a scientific experiment circa 1900-1950. Do you sell that Bien as a REAL detector ?

I dont know anything. This is not remotely sold as a Bien. I had one hand on a boar up on pole with the other hand on a clod that some others were hauling up on hay, and once i got close enough to the acute angle the tip of the hand bounced off a 4″ thick face, and on to a pine log, and then down into muddy water.

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