The Romans and the ‘Magic’ Lens

The Romans took to using a ‘magic lens’ to capture the details under great magnification. Made with a round lens and clear glass mount, the lens was used to punch large holes through the human eye without even having to remove it and then inject wax, which was stored in the lens ring of the lens barrel, to concentrate the light on the lens itself and create the minute focus that allows to go out to 1:1 reproduction ratio.

Close up images from a magical lens became the best ever known. Macro photography is the art of capturing the detail of very small subjects that may not be seen by the naked eye.

Technically, to fall under the category of “macro,” the subject should be captured with a reproduction ratio of 1:1 (i.e., the subject will be captured on the sensor at 100% life-size).

The Romans took to using a ‘magic lens’ to capture the details under great magnification. Made with a round lens and clear glass mount, the lens was used to punch large holes through the human eye without even having to remove it and then inject wax, which was stored in the lens ring of the lens barrel, to concentrate the light on the lens itself and create the minute focus that allows to go out to 1:1 reproduction ratio. Close up images from a magical lens became the best ever known.

Interesting concept. Isera, your photographs looked like they were shot with a magnification device, like in a scientific experiment circa 1900-1950. Do you sell that Bien as a REAL detector ?

I dont know anything. This is not remotely sold as a Bien. I had one hand on a boar up on pole with the other hand on a clod that some others were hauling up on hay, and once i got close enough to the acute angle the tip of the hand bounced off a 4″ thick face, and on to a pine log, and then down into muddy water.

Navigation